There are over 3,000 skin conditions

Our skin is an amazing structure. There are over 3,000 known skin conditions, which include conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne, rosacea and seborrhoeic dermatitis. Data suggests that in the UK, 55% of the population have a skin disorder. These conditions often cause considerable discomfort and stress. Topical treatments such as balms/emollient creams/moisturisers and steroids are the normal course of action, often providing symptomatic relief, but these treatments unfortunately do not get to the root cause. So what are the key factors that in clinic often help to resolve these distressing conditions?

Optimal skin health is dependent on sufficient supplies of micronutrients including vitamins A, B3, B5, biotin, C, D (optimisation of vitamin D levels can reduce the severity of eczema in 4 weeks), E, K2, the minerals zinc, sulphur, selenium and silica and balanced essential fats. Nutrient density of the diet and efficient absorption are therefore key. We are not what we eat, we are what we absorb!

Absorption can be impacted by so many different variables including imbalances in the bacterial species of the gut (dysbiosis) – there is an irrefutable ‘gut-skin axis’ with skin health directly reflecting what is going on inside us; the presence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth – SIBO (where the small intestine is overgrown with bacteria from the colon – correlated with rosacea); physical damage to the small intestine caused by undiagnosed coeliac disease (which is one of the most common lifelong disorders in North America and Europe) and inflammation caused by non-coeliac gluten/wheat sensitivity. The presence of a ‘leaky gut’ caused by dysbiosis can lead to a lack of ‘oral tolerance’ of any number of foods, which can drive skin inflammation.

Liver and kidney function are also important. The skin is a detoxification organ and if the liver and kidneys are under pressure then skin health may be impacted. So a proper evaluation of your environment is key (fabric conditioner, detergents and personal care products).

Finally excess histamine can often be a significant factor (stress is a potent histamine trigger), which is why a low histamine diet can often help. If this approach does work, then gut health and nutrient status warrant further investigation.

So if you have a chronic skin condition and want to regain control, work with a functionally qualified health professional. Everything in the body is connected – nothing exists in isolation.

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